FAA Reporting on Boeing 737 Max pilot Training

Photo by:Boeing
Boeing 737Max Simulator

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced a report on the proposing pilot training procedures for the Boeing 737 MAX. The report could be a significant step forward for the recertification of the aircraft, which has been grounded for over 18 months after two fatal crashes.

Six things have been added to the 737 MAX pilot training procedures, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) on the 737 MAX. MCAS is a piece of safety software that was believed to have malfunctioned in the two fatal accidents in Ethiopia and Indonesia that claimed the lives of 346 passengers and not that long later the 737 MAX aircraft was grounded in March 2019.

The pilot training will include all Boeing 737 Max Family, this contain ground and flight training.

Photo by: Boeing
The FAA proposes new training procedures for 737 MAX pilots.

Lets talk in specification of pilot training.

Pilots should also experience runaway stabilizer training that require them to use a manual stabilizer trim techniques during approach, go-around, and level off. In addition, they must undergo demonstrations of false indications of high Angle of Attack on takeoff. The explanation must include a go-around or missed approach.

Why are the things that 737 pilots should demonstrate?

The 737 Max has a tendency to pitch up, and MCAS is designed to correct the action and maintain the pitch stability of the aircraft. The system will be activate during manual flight at an high Angle Of Attack.

In the two previous fatal accidents mentioned above, the MCAS software had a dangerous role when it was erroneously (Showed False indications) and repeatedly activated by fault from the data by the sensor.

The MCAS software receives data from a single Angle Of Attack (AOA) sensor. Now the FAA requires MCAS to receive data from two sensors instead of one for not repeating the same critical mistakes.

Photo by: Boeing
The MACS software will be updated

FAA Chief Steve Dickson who made a test flight in the 737 MAX said that he is satisfied from what he saw and that the aircraft is on the its final course. The FAA needs to finalize the new updates of the MACS software and the rest of the upgrades. It was mentioned before that the 737 MAX could resume passenger flights by the end of the year 2020, but it may change and there is no specific date.

Photo by: Boeing
The 737 MAX could resume as commercial flights the end of the year.