Have you ever wondered which type of aircraft you were going to be flying on when travelling? Were you going to fly on a relatively large plane or a small one? The answer depends on the type of route you were travelling on. Aircraft are specifically designed to operate routes of a certain distance, so the plane that you would be flying on would typically be a plane designed to fly that type of route. In this article, we will be taking a look at which planes are usually used for short, medium, and long haul commercial flights.

Let’s just say it like it is, not everyone can be a pilot. It’s not easy, there are certain requirements not everyone possess. It’s nothing personal, for example, I can’t be a pharmacist or a lawyer? It makes sense, it’s too late, I’ve already made my “life” choice. Wait, why can’t I be a pharmacist? I can be a lawyer if I wanted to. It’ll take a lot of time and effort but if I’m passionate about it, I can easily do it. You know what? anyone can be a pilot. Still though, like any career choice in the world, there are a list of requirements you’d need to fill.

We already know what VFR stands for, visual flight rules, but what is Special VFR? First, let’s recap, visual flight rules (VFR) is a set of rules under which a pilot operates an aircraft in generally fair weather where the pilot can clearly see where the plane is going. Generally, the basic VFR minimums are, visibility should be at least 3 statute miles and distance from clouds should be 500ft below, 1000ft above, and 2000ft horizontal. So, what’s the difference between basic VFR and Special VFR? What makes it so special?

During the night of 20th of March of 2009, An Airbus A340 was to fly out of Melbourne to Dubai with 275 people on board. The flight was to depart Melbourne at 10:25 local time and the flight time was 14hrs 8mins. As the crew prepared for departure, the pilots were busy in the cockpit preparing the plane for departure.