Let’s just say it like it is, not everyone can be a pilot. It’s not easy, there are certain requirements not everyone possess. It’s nothing personal, for example, I can’t be a pharmacist or a lawyer? It makes sense, it’s too late, I’ve already made my “life” choice. Wait, why can’t I be a pharmacist? I can be a lawyer if I wanted to. It’ll take a lot of time and effort but if I’m passionate about it, I can easily do it. You know what? anyone can be a pilot. Still though, like any career choice in the world, there are a list of requirements you’d need to fill.

The story of the two US Navy pilots, Lt. Cody and Ensign Adams, who disappeared into thin air. After 78 years, what happened to these men remains a mystery. There were various theories and suggestions about how the scene was played in the blimp, but nonetheless, remained theories and suggestions since nothing was confirmed. Thus, the story of “the Ghost Blimp” was born.

In November 2003, Baghdad airport was the home to American troops in Iraq. The US Air force flew in daily to supply the troops and help at its best to help rebuild the country. Around and outside the airport are terrorists therefore Apache helicopters are deployed full time to check and eliminate any kind of threats.

We already know what VFR stands for, visual flight rules, but what is Special VFR? First, let’s recap, visual flight rules (VFR) is a set of rules under which a pilot operates an aircraft in generally fair weather where the pilot can clearly see where the plane is going. Generally, the basic VFR minimums are, visibility should be at least 3 statute miles and distance from clouds should be 500ft below, 1000ft above, and 2000ft horizontal. So, what’s the difference between basic VFR and Special VFR? What makes it so special?