An inspirational story about the pilot, Jessica Cox, who achieved what was thought to be impossible. She was able to fly and earn her licence despite being born without arms. Even though she had her fair share of constant disappointments and difficult times, she was able to fight through and fulfil her dream.

The story of the two US Navy pilots, Lt. Cody and Ensign Adams, who disappeared into thin air. After 78 years, what happened to these men remains a mystery. There were various theories and suggestions about how the scene was played in the blimp, but nonetheless, remained theories and suggestions since nothing was confirmed. Thus, the story of “the Ghost Blimp” was born.

We already know what VFR stands for, visual flight rules, but what is Special VFR? First, let’s recap, visual flight rules (VFR) is a set of rules under which a pilot operates an aircraft in generally fair weather where the pilot can clearly see where the plane is going. Generally, the basic VFR minimums are, visibility should be at least 3 statute miles and distance from clouds should be 500ft below, 1000ft above, and 2000ft horizontal. So, what’s the difference between basic VFR and Special VFR? What makes it so special?

I know what you’re thinking: Flying cars have a history? Do they even exist? At least that’s what I also thought, and it turns out it’s a long one. It starts in 1917 with Glenn Curtiss, who built the Curtiss autoplane, a combination between an automobile and an airplane, it was something unheard of back then. It looked like a car but with wings attached, so obviously, it never flew. It was only capable of making “short hops”. The good news is that it was the first stepping stone towards the exploration of the possibility of having flying cars in the future.

Pilots need to have great self-awareness; they need to understand what they’re capable of. Each flight is different, so while pilots do a thorough check of their aircraft, they must also evaluate their fitness for the flight. They must create a checklist to help them understand if whether or not they are prepared for that specific flight. They have checklists for everything and for this particular assessment they have the I’M SAFE checklist to fully understand their capabilities for flight.

May 2020: The corona virus pandemic has reached more than 4 Million cases world-wide and the need for medical supplies has reached an all time peak. Correspondingly, the need for cargo flights have skyrocketed as well.