The least popular variant of the 747 has been unexpectedly brought back into commercial service after being absent for almost 2 years. A few weeks ago, Iranian based carrier “Mahan Air” reactivated one of their old 747-300s after it had been on the ground since 2015. Only 81 747-300s were ever built, and almost all of them are retired. As of 2020, the only 747-300 that remained in operation was a cargo plane owned by Trans Avia Export Cargo Airlines. The return of such an uncommon plane for passenger use is certainly a rare and surprising occurrence. In this article, we will be explaining why Mahan Air brought back and revived the 747-300.

As the Boeing 737 MAX planes have been gradually reinstated into service this past year, another problem has emerged with the infamous aircraft. Just a couple of months after the FAA approved of the aircraft’s re-entry into service, Boeing has discovered a production error in several of its Boeing 737 MAX aircraft and has called for the removal of several of these planes from service. This minor additional issue brings up questions about if this aircraft is actually safe to fly, and it could further damage the reputation of the aircraft type. In this article, we will discuss what the electrical issue actually is and how it has affected airlines with the 737 MAX.

Emirates claims the title of the World’s Best Airline. Fittingly, the First Class cabin on Emirates Airlines is nonetheless a prestigious and luxurious flying experience – even being called the “hotel in the sky”. Emirates continues to surprise us in every way possible. From complete entertainment systems and gourmet meals to spas at 30,000 ft., what would you say? Luxurious or outrageous?

Almost 50 years ago, the first commercial supersonic jet was introduced into the world, revolutionizing air travel and opening a new chapter in the way people flew. Flying at 2 times the speed of sound and faster than the spin of the Earth, Concorde was a peak of innovation in aviation, and it allowed people to travel across the Atlantic Ocean in just 3 hours. Today, however, the time of flight for the same distance is double. In this sense, aviation seems to have taken a step backwards since the Concorde. If no level of innovation could match that of the Concorde, then why exactly was it retired?