Ever since the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the aviation industry has been playing a critical role in the transportation of this valuable asset. Countries all around the world are in urgent need of this vaccine, and the world is counting on it to put an end to the global pandemic. However, the transportation of this vaccine also comes with many challenges. The shipping of the COVID-19 vaccine is not as simple as it sounds; it’s not just loading cargo into an aircraft and then flying the cargo to its destination. The process is much more intricate and complicated, and one simple mistake could ruin the entire shipment and cause the vaccines to be useless. 

Yes, that title is correct. Flying is safer than grocery shopping during this global pandemic. How could flying on a plane, the main cause for the spread of COVID-19, be safer than grocery shopping? It may seem unbelievable, but it’s true. Even the thought of flying during the pandemic may terrify many people, but rest assured, the risk of contracting COVID-19 on an aircraft is significantly lower than the risk of contracting the virus from simple daily activities such as shopping in a store or eating in a restaurant.

The Airbus A318 is the smallest aircraft of the A320 family, dubbed “the baby bus” it never sold as well as other variants of the A320 family.With British Airways retiring their one and only aircraft, that previously operated an exclusive business class service out of London city airport to New York’s JFK as BA1 (Using the flight number once used for Concorde flights to JFK), it is becoming harder to travel on the A318. So today we are going to be taking a look at the airlines that still operate the aircraft.

There is perhaps no other commercial airliner as iconic as the Boeing 747. A presence in our skies for over fifty years, it has transported millions of passengers across the world. Since its introduction with Pan American Airlines in 1970, it has persevered as one of the forerunners of commercial flight. Often labeled as the ‘Queen of the Skies’.

Nowadays, the globe is undergoing extraordinary conditions-ones that were never experienced before! These conditions are especially tough on the aviation and airlines industry; but with travel demand increasing day by day and as countries loosen restrictions, airlines and airplane manufacturers are mounting a major push to build confidence among travellers.

The covid-19 pandemic has drastically reduced the demand for aircraft meaning that airlines don’t particularly need their older fleets of aircraft such as the 747. This week Qantas completed its last commercial flight before the aircraft are scrapped. However, last night a memo was sent to British Airways staff with the news of the airline considering retiring the aircraft.

The morning of July 15th, an airplane of Etihad Airways coming from the United Arab Emirates landed at Mexico City’s International Airport. The aircraft was carrying medical equipment and supplies intended to the medical authorities to attend the COVID-19 patients and mexican citizens previously stranded in the arab country.

There is no doubt that the covid-19 pandemic will have long lasting effects on the world for years to come. However in the middle of a pandemic that has proven to have the worst effect on the world’s economy to date, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has given the go ahead for his Aircraft to be repainted at an astonishing price of (aprox) £900,000.

The world finds itself in the 5th month since the massive spread of the new COVID-19 virus, and the airlines sector is taking new movements to reactivate the normal operations under the new status quo known as “the new normal”. One of the airlines that is trying to survive the medical crisis is Interjet, the mexican low-cost airline founded in 2005.

Two days ago on July 3rd 2020, the news was released that Air France and Hop! airlines are taking into consideration reducing their operational staff to the quantity of 7,580 workers-at least until 2022. This is considered as a possible measure to resist and cope with the low demand in air transport produced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

While the world is still working through the covid-19 pandemic, we are starting to make our way back to some form of normality.With that people are starting to want to travel again, so today we will be looking at the UK government’s list of countries that vistors can arrive from and not have to quarantine; and what that means for airlines across the globe.

As countries around the world start to get the coronavirus under control, we will now start to see the slow rebound of air travel. Although airlines don’t expect that capacity will recover to pre-pandemic levels until around the middle of the decade, their main focus now is to start trying to get back to normal-notably shown by the relaunch of 4 US routes by Turkish Airlines in the month of June.

Have you ever been sitting in the airport waiting for your flight whilst watching planes with different sizes taxiing, taking – off, and/or landing infront of you? Did that ever make you wonder what type of planes are these? And how specialists differentiate between them?

The aviation industry is going through a very tough time nowadays due to the global spread of the corona virus, and with its negative repercussions on the aviation industry, demand is at an all time low for air travel. Analysts say that the current effect is larger that the aftermaths of 9/11 and the 2008 depression combined.

May 2020: The corona virus pandemic has reached more than 4 Million cases world-wide and the need for medical supplies has reached an all time peak. Correspondingly, the need for cargo flights have skyrocketed as well.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) supports the idea of wearing face coverings for passengers and masks for crew while on board aircraft as a temporary procedure to prevent from the spread of CoronaVirus (COVID19) when people return to traveling by air.

COVID-19 has proven to be a tumultuous time for people worldwide. In their effort to keep people safe, certain airlines have instituted new policies which include passengers having to wear a mask when flying aboard their aircraft and transitting through the airport.

South African Airways (SAA) has been a hot topic in the will-they-won’t-they collapse conversation. The Business Rescue Partners (BRP’s) requested a ZAR 10 Billion bailout from the South African Government-which was denied. As such, the BRP’s have stated that they intend to begin proceedings on retrenching their entire staff by the end of this month.