Let’s just say it like it is, not everyone can be a pilot. It’s not easy, there are certain requirements not everyone possess. It’s nothing personal, for example, I can’t be a pharmacist or a lawyer? It makes sense, it’s too late, I’ve already made my “life” choice. Wait, why can’t I be a pharmacist? I can be a lawyer if I wanted to. It’ll take a lot of time and effort but if I’m passionate about it, I can easily do it. You know what? anyone can be a pilot. Still though, like any career choice in the world, there are a list of requirements you’d need to fill.

We already know what VFR stands for, visual flight rules, but what is Special VFR? First, let’s recap, visual flight rules (VFR) is a set of rules under which a pilot operates an aircraft in generally fair weather where the pilot can clearly see where the plane is going. Generally, the basic VFR minimums are, visibility should be at least 3 statute miles and distance from clouds should be 500ft below, 1000ft above, and 2000ft horizontal. So, what’s the difference between basic VFR and Special VFR? What makes it so special?

It is not only about piloting the aircraft but also driving to the boarding gates, that means taxiing the plane with a safe coordination to engine shutdown. How it is performed? A tool used as a standard in many air operations, the commonly known Marshalling Signals. These are intended for use by the signalman using the hands and in required cases the torchlights allowing visual communication between the crew and the personnel in ground.