Flying in an Uncontrolled Airspace

Do you know what’s it like to fly without the assistance of Air Traffic Control (ATC)? If yes, then you must’ve flown in class G airspace, if the answer is no, this article will let you know what to expact.

Photo: wikiwand

Class G airspace, according to FAA, is the portion of the airspace that has not been designated as Class A, B, C, D, or E. It is therefore designated uncontrolled airspace. Class G airspace extends from the surface to the base of the overlying Class E airspace.

Even though Class G is uncontrolled, it doesn’t mean that a pilot can just do whatever comes to mind, there are still regulations that need to be followed. For example, there aren’t any specific instruments recquired for VFR pilots below 10,000ft MSL, but a Mode-C transponder is required for VFR pilots flying above 10,000 feet MSL.

Photo: flyingmag.com

While IFR pilots pilots must meet standard IFR equipment requirements, as well as meet IFR flight level or altitude requirements, remaining at least 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal distance of 4 nautical miles from their course.

Photo: boldmethod.com

What are the Weather Minimums in uncontrolled airspace :

Photo: thinkaviation
  • 10,000 feet MSL or higher
    • 5 sm visibility
    • Cloud clearance minimums of 1,000 feet above, 1,000 feet below, and 2,000 feet horizontally
  • Above 1,200 feet AGL but below 10,000 feet MSL during the day
    • 1 sm visibility
    • Cloud clearance minimums of 1,000 feet above, 500 feet below, and 2,000 feet horizontally
  • Above 1,200 feet AGL but below 10,000 feet MSL at night
    • 3 sm visibility
    • Cloud clearance minimums of 1,000 feet above, 500 feet below, and 2,000 feet horizontally
  • 1,200 feet AGL and lower during the day
    • 1 sm visibility
    • Clear of clouds vertically and horizontally
  • 1,200 feet AGL and lower at night
    • 3 sm visibility
    • Cloud clearance minimums of 1,000 feet above, 500 feet below, and 2,000 feet horizontally
  • Below 1,200 feet AGL, at night, within ½ mile of airport, and in the traffic pattern
    • 1 sm visibility
    • Clear of clouds vertically and horizontally
Photo: newindianexpress.com

Last but not least, though ATC is absent, pilots take it among themselves to report their positions in order to increase safety. Therefore, pilots in Class G airspace do their best to help other pilots see and avoid them. So, there you have it, whether controlled or uncontrolled, a pilot’s priority is to always ensure a safe flight.


Source:

https://www.pilotmall.com/blogs/news/class-g-airspace-everything-you-need-to-know

http://www.faa.gov

cover photo: independent.co.uk

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