Iceland is now open to vaccinated travelers, including Americans, with no quarantine. As of April 6, 2021, all travelers (regardless of origin) who can show proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or prior COVID-19 infection now have permission to enter Iceland. But before you start plotting your trip to see the still-erupting Fagradalsfjall volcano, there are some things to know.

Ever since the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the aviation industry has been playing a critical role in the transportation of this valuable asset. Countries all around the world are in urgent need of this vaccine, and the world is counting on it to put an end to the global pandemic. However, the transportation of this vaccine also comes with many challenges. The shipping of the COVID-19 vaccine is not as simple as it sounds; it’s not just loading cargo into an aircraft and then flying the cargo to its destination. The process is much more intricate and complicated, and one simple mistake could ruin the entire shipment and cause the vaccines to be useless. 

This year, the airline industry has been severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s been a tough year in aviation and many things have changed. One particularly interesting change that has occurred this year is the change in the food service of airlines. Food has been a key part of the flying experience, and this article will explore the ways the novel coronavirus has impacted this experience.

Yes, that title is correct. Flying is safer than grocery shopping during this global pandemic. How could flying on a plane, the main cause for the spread of COVID-19, be safer than grocery shopping? It may seem unbelievable, but it’s true. Even the thought of flying during the pandemic may terrify many people, but rest assured, the risk of contracting COVID-19 on an aircraft is significantly lower than the risk of contracting the virus from simple daily activities such as shopping in a store or eating in a restaurant.

The morning of July 15th, an airplane of Etihad Airways coming from the United Arab Emirates landed at Mexico City’s International Airport. The aircraft was carrying medical equipment and supplies intended to the medical authorities to attend the COVID-19 patients and mexican citizens previously stranded in the arab country.

The world finds itself in the 5th month since the massive spread of the new COVID-19 virus, and the airlines sector is taking new movements to reactivate the normal operations under the new status quo known as “the new normal”. One of the airlines that is trying to survive the medical crisis is Interjet, the mexican low-cost airline founded in 2005.