‘Is that a UFO?’ or ‘That surely is not a plane!’ are the words coming out of almost everyone when the B-2 flew past them. Although the B-2 was not a UFO, it could disappear like one in a blink of an eye. A plane, so unmatched and different that people still do date are seen scratching their heads when they see one. US’s most formidable and mysterious of weapons is the sole best-known stealth aircraft in the world, capable of dropping both conventional and nuclear payloads.

Ever since the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the aviation industry has been playing a critical role in the transportation of this valuable asset. Countries all around the world are in urgent need of this vaccine, and the world is counting on it to put an end to the global pandemic. However, the transportation of this vaccine also comes with many challenges. The shipping of the COVID-19 vaccine is not as simple as it sounds; it’s not just loading cargo into an aircraft and then flying the cargo to its destination. The process is much more intricate and complicated, and one simple mistake could ruin the entire shipment and cause the vaccines to be useless. 

This year, the airline industry has been severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s been a tough year in aviation and many things have changed. One particularly interesting change that has occurred this year is the change in the food service of airlines. Food has been a key part of the flying experience, and this article will explore the ways the novel coronavirus has impacted this experience.

Yes, that title is correct. Flying is safer than grocery shopping during this global pandemic. How could flying on a plane, the main cause for the spread of COVID-19, be safer than grocery shopping? It may seem unbelievable, but it’s true. Even the thought of flying during the pandemic may terrify many people, but rest assured, the risk of contracting COVID-19 on an aircraft is significantly lower than the risk of contracting the virus from simple daily activities such as shopping in a store or eating in a restaurant.

Airbus has today released its third-quarter financial results. Like all companies across the aviation industry, the European plane manufacturer has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in addition to the sudden lack of demand for new commercial aircraft. The company said that it had incurred €1 billion of COVID-19 pandemic.

Boeing has decreased its ambitious plans among the 737 Max deliveries, the plan was that they were able to deliver 450 aircraft. The airline now only expects to deliver about half of that, or around 225 aircraft by the end of 2021, with the remaining being delivered in 2022.

As we know, the 1st industrial revolution was mainly started because of the steam engine which started at 1760s. From this point the innovation in the steam engine made it to the ICE or the internal combustion engine. The ICE has revolutionized the world transportation until now. This type of engine is first type in our story of aircraft propulsion.

The basis of designing anything comes from the goal of this product. Such as the goal of an aircraft is to transport people from point A to point B in an easy and efficient way while flying in the air. Then looking on any previous or existing designs which will aid the upcoming new one. After that engineers apply the fundamentals of the science behind building up an aircraft.

Most of us have faced flight delays at least once. And these delays could be one of the two situations. The first is a controllable situation which could be the performance of the maintenance team, passenger punctuality, or terminal changing. The second is not under the control of the airline such as weather conditions, malfunction of the plane which needs more hours of maintenance, security issues, or air traffic control.

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted airlines greatly with many airlines reporting astonishing losses, with a vaccine still undergoing trials and Europe facing a second wave it seems that airlines will start to reshuffle their fleets and lay-off more staff. The Airbus A380 has been an aircraft that has been a casualty of the pandemic, we have already seen Air France retire its A380s and rumours that British Airways will retire their A380 Fleet the next airline to be considering the retirement of their A380s is German Flag Carrier, Lufthansa.

There is perhaps no other commercial airliner as iconic as the Boeing 747. A presence in our skies for over fifty years, it has transported millions of passengers across the world. Since its introduction with Pan American Airlines in 1970, it has persevered as one of the forerunners of commercial flight. Often labeled as the ‘Queen of the Skies’.

Nowadays, the globe is undergoing extraordinary conditions-ones that were never experienced before! These conditions are especially tough on the aviation and airlines industry; but with travel demand increasing day by day and as countries loosen restrictions, airlines and airplane manufacturers are mounting a major push to build confidence among travellers.

While the world is still working through the covid-19 pandemic, we are starting to make our way back to some form of normality.With that people are starting to want to travel again, so today we will be looking at the UK government’s list of countries that vistors can arrive from and not have to quarantine; and what that means for airlines across the globe.

As countries around the world start to get the coronavirus under control, we will now start to see the slow rebound of air travel. Although airlines don’t expect that capacity will recover to pre-pandemic levels until around the middle of the decade, their main focus now is to start trying to get back to normal-notably shown by the relaunch of 4 US routes by Turkish Airlines in the month of June.

Have you ever been sitting in the airport waiting for your flight whilst watching planes with different sizes taxiing, taking – off, and/or landing infront of you? Did that ever make you wonder what type of planes are these? And how specialists differentiate between them?

The aviation industry is going through a very tough time nowadays due to the global spread of the corona virus, and with its negative repercussions on the aviation industry, demand is at an all time low for air travel. Analysts say that the current effect is larger that the aftermaths of 9/11 and the 2008 depression combined.

May 2020: The corona virus pandemic has reached more than 4 Million cases world-wide and the need for medical supplies has reached an all time peak. Correspondingly, the need for cargo flights have skyrocketed as well.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) supports the idea of wearing face coverings for passengers and masks for crew while on board aircraft as a temporary procedure to prevent from the spread of CoronaVirus (COVID19) when people return to traveling by air.

COVID-19 has proven to be a tumultuous time for people worldwide. In their effort to keep people safe, certain airlines have instituted new policies which include passengers having to wear a mask when flying aboard their aircraft and transitting through the airport.

Have you ever listened to a conversation between a pilot and the air traffic controller (ATC) during a flight? If yes, then for sure you noticed that they mention strange words in their conversations Like ‘Romeo’, ‘Juliet’ and ‘Hotel’ for example! But why they are saying this in their flight?! Of course you know our normal English letters (A, B, C,…etc.), and because certain letters sound very similar, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created what is called “International Radio telephony Spelling Alphabet.”

South African Airways (SAA) has been a hot topic in the will-they-won’t-they collapse conversation. The Business Rescue Partners (BRP’s) requested a ZAR 10 Billion bailout from the South African Government-which was denied. As such, the BRP’s have stated that they intend to begin proceedings on retrenching their entire staff by the end of this month.