Iceland is now open to vaccinated travelers, including Americans, with no quarantine. As of April 6, 2021, all travelers (regardless of origin) who can show proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or prior COVID-19 infection now have permission to enter Iceland. But before you start plotting your trip to see the still-erupting Fagradalsfjall volcano, there are some things to know.

Ever since the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the aviation industry has been playing a critical role in the transportation of this valuable asset. Countries all around the world are in urgent need of this vaccine, and the world is counting on it to put an end to the global pandemic. However, the transportation of this vaccine also comes with many challenges. The shipping of the COVID-19 vaccine is not as simple as it sounds; it’s not just loading cargo into an aircraft and then flying the cargo to its destination. The process is much more intricate and complicated, and one simple mistake could ruin the entire shipment and cause the vaccines to be useless. 

Nowadays, the globe is undergoing extraordinary conditions-ones that were never experienced before! These conditions are especially tough on the aviation and airlines industry; but with travel demand increasing day by day and as countries loosen restrictions, airlines and airplane manufacturers are mounting a major push to build confidence among travellers.

As countries around the world start to get the coronavirus under control, we will now start to see the slow rebound of air travel. Although airlines don’t expect that capacity will recover to pre-pandemic levels until around the middle of the decade, their main focus now is to start trying to get back to normal-notably shown by the relaunch of 4 US routes by Turkish Airlines in the month of June.

The aviation industry is going through a very tough time nowadays due to the global spread of the corona virus, and with its negative repercussions on the aviation industry, demand is at an all time low for air travel. Analysts say that the current effect is larger that the aftermaths of 9/11 and the 2008 depression combined.

May 2020: The corona virus pandemic has reached more than 4 Million cases world-wide and the need for medical supplies has reached an all time peak. Correspondingly, the need for cargo flights have skyrocketed as well.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) supports the idea of wearing face coverings for passengers and masks for crew while on board aircraft as a temporary procedure to prevent from the spread of CoronaVirus (COVID19) when people return to traveling by air.

COVID-19 has proven to be a tumultuous time for people worldwide. In their effort to keep people safe, certain airlines have instituted new policies which include passengers having to wear a mask when flying aboard their aircraft and transitting through the airport.

Have you ever listened to a conversation between a pilot and the air traffic controller (ATC) during a flight? If yes, then for sure you noticed that they mention strange words in their conversations Like ‘Romeo’, ‘Juliet’ and ‘Hotel’ for example! But why they are saying this in their flight?! Of course you know our normal English letters (A, B, C,…etc.), and because certain letters sound very similar, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created what is called “International Radio telephony Spelling Alphabet.”

South African Airways (SAA) has been a hot topic in the will-they-won’t-they collapse conversation. The Business Rescue Partners (BRP’s) requested a ZAR 10 Billion bailout from the South African Government-which was denied. As such, the BRP’s have stated that they intend to begin proceedings on retrenching their entire staff by the end of this month.

So you’ve boarded an aircraft, strapped yourself in, and the crew announces to the pilot saying “Cabin crew ready for takeoff”. The plane then starts moving slowly for a while. The momentum pushes you into your seat and suddenly you find yourself in the air looking down on the airport below.

Lets see what exactly happens here: When the plane starts to move it follows ATC’s commands to taxi to the runway, navigating through the airport’s taxiways and finally reaching the runway.